12 ways your instructional materials can support students this fall | A back-to-school guide


After more than a year of physical (and metaphorical) distance, this back-to-school season might just be the most joyful one yet. Administrators are considering how to best balance the need for connection and engagement within their broader learning recovery plans. We’ve created this guide to show why engaging, flexible instructional materials ought to be the bedrock of any learning recovery plan.

Receive Content

Key Takeaways

img
Pitfalls to avoid when choosing instructional materials for your learning recovery plan.
img
Checklists to ensure your instructional materials address student engagement, learning acceleration, whole-child needs, and assessment connections.
img
An overview of how Newsela is uniquely positioned to address your needs for this coming school year -- and beyond.

Preview


Read the first paragraph of this guide here

Decision-making in the current moment is uniquely challenging. Students will return to the classroom this fall with massive variations in experiences and abilities unlike ever before. Pressure is mounting from the national- and state-level to recover “lost learning.” With so much at stake, it might feel like skill and drill approaches are the safest and only option. We've created this guide to offer an alternate perspective.

Other Newsela Content

6-common-gaps-resource-card.png

GUIDE

6 common gaps in core materials and how to fill them

Why does the average district in America access over 1400 tech tools each month? A primary reason is that educators are looking for ways to fill gaps in their core curricular resources.

information-sessions-resource-card.png

Information Session

Learn about Newsela in 20 minutes

Join us to hear about three ways that curriculum leaders can leverage Newsela to close common gaps in core curricular resources.

hall-county-resource-card.png

SUCCESS STORY

How one district is using Newsela to elevate its curriculum

Hall County teachers had been moving away from widespread textbook use and instead were looking for instructional materials that engaged students while building autonomy.